Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

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FrenchForumSurvivor
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Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by FrenchForumSurvivor »

Le Démerdeur wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 5:44 pm
Myself as well. History not taught in my school, it became Humanities & the teachers smoked dope in front of the class.
When I was a lad we smoked dope behind the classroom.
"I am a man of fixed and unbending principles, the first of which is to be flexible at all times." - Everett Dirksen

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Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by rabbit »

Catholic’s used to burn Protestants and vice versa. Should we remove every Christian statue in the U.K.?

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Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by jsks »

rabbit wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 6:01 pm
Catholic’s used to burn Protestants and vice versa. Should we remove every Christian statue in the U.K.?
If you could identify an individual as guilty of religious murder then, yes, that person's statue should be removed.

There's a lot of Irish people not altogether happy with statuary of Oliver Cromwell.

Ally

Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by Ally »

King William lll, William Prince of Orange, the protestant icon, bought Colston's share of RAC in 1689, A year later he won the Battle of the Boyne, which is celebrated in the north of Ireland, Scotland and Liverpool every July. Ergo, -1Orange Walks celebrate a victory funded by the slave trade. Oops.
Could the days be numbered for his statues in Glasgow and Hul? And for Orange Walks?

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Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by rabbit »

jsks wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 6:59 pm
rabbit wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 6:01 pm
Catholic’s used to burn Protestants and vice versa. Should we remove every Christian statue in the U.K.?
If you could identify an individual as guilty of religious murder then, yes, that person's statue should be removed.

There's a lot of Irish people not altogether happy with statuary of Oliver Cromwell.
And a lot of English too

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Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by Timoth »

This is of interest if you can either read it or translate it
https://la1ere.francetvinfo.fr/2015/05/ ... Qg-PLuHBRo

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Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by lindal1000 »

Apparently Yaxley-Lennon's boys were telling everyone that they should pull down all statues of Allah. That should take them a while because Islam forbids idolatry so there are no statues. That's my view to be honest. They (statues) serve no purpose..the person is usually dead and I would rather read about them than stare at a piece of bronze or stone.

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Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by Le Démerdeur »

I admire first and foremost the skill and artistry that has gone into their creation, they make impressive landmarks and many places would be naked without them, if they tell a story whether it be inspiring or reflective then so much the better.

None of these things were taught to me at school, even at good schools the curriculum cannot extend to everything, statues or memorials grab your interest and the plaques explaining them can set you on the road for further research, especially important when you are in a foreign country as they expose you to things that you would never have known about or taken interest in.

I have stumbled across some amazing small memorials far off the beaten track here including one in a field near Beauvais miles from anywhere marking the site of the R101 airship disaster which I knew nothing about, there is actually a memorial but it is now completely hidden and foregotten behind a road intersection.

Also the crash site of one of the bombers in the operation Jericho WW2 break out from Amiens prison, reading up on these things later led me to the graves of the British victims that had not been visited in decades, some maybe never at all.

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Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by Flaneur »

Here's something I didn't know: "Estimates are that, across three centuries, corsairs operating out of Barbary coast ports (in north Africa) captured and enslaved more than a million Europeans."

https://www.historyextra.com/period/stu ... 4U1JGxVusY
Same old nonsense.

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Re: Abolition Of Slavery And Of The Trade Itself.

Post by b33jay »

Le Démerdeur wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:34 pm
I admire first and foremost the skill and artistry that has gone into their creation, they make impressive landmarks and many places would be naked without them, if they tell a story whether it be inspiring or reflective then so much the better.

None of these things were taught to me at school, even at good schools the curriculum cannot extend to everything, statues or memorials grab your interest and the plaques explaining them can set you on the road for further research, especially important when you are in a foreign country as they expose you to things that you would never have known about or taken interest in.

I have stumbled across some amazing small memorials far off the beaten track here including one in a field near Beauvais miles from anywhere marking the site of the R101 airship disaster which I knew nothing about, there is actually a memorial but it is now completely hidden and foregotten behind a road intersection.

Also the crash site of one of the bombers in the operation Jericho WW2 break out from Amiens prison, reading up on these things later led me to the graves of the British victims that had not been visited in decades, some maybe never at all.
I live a few miles from the airship hangars from which the R101 started that flight. Because of my interest in the sublect I visited the Beauvais memorial many years ago.

I agree with you about memorials triggering an interest to pursue the subjects further which I have done many times. For example at the top of the Île d'Oleron I came across a small village cemetery in which were UK war graves dated 1940 of sailors and soldiers. After researching later it turned out they were from the RMS Lancastria which was bombed leaving St Nazaire on 17th June 1940 with an estimated 3800-5000 people on board when it sank, the largest shipping loss of life in British history. The graves were of bodies that had drifted down the coast.

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