Making the move into the French Tax system

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bubbles1
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Re: Making the move into the French Tax system

Post by bubbles1 » Sat Apr 28, 2018 10:43 pm

Yep - " la belle" but the 185 day rule applied hence we didnt have to declare any income for that year. I obviously dont know what date you registered your "domicile" here but it seems you declared income here to get a rebate. - brill - you seem to be relating everyone elses situation to your own.
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exile
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Re: Making the move into the French Tax system

Post by exile » Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:41 am

Sorry Bubbles but once again you jump to conclusions.

Yes I did declare income. All of it earned and taxed abroad. Hence tax liability in France zero. Hence the surprise at a tax rebate.

I repeat my previous challenge to you and anyone else. Please find some official document that states you have to be in France for more than half a year (just so we don't get bogged down in an exact number) before registering for becoming tax liable. I am quite prepared to be shown to be wrong if such a document exists. I just have not found it yet.

If people persist in claiming a 183 +/- day rule when none exists, there is a real chance of someone else coming a real cropper with the authorities - though more likely a 15€ fine.

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bubbles1
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Re: Making the move into the French Tax system

Post by bubbles1 » Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:31 pm

From memory itis all to do with the double taxation agreement between various (not all) countries. I didnt say you have to be resident herein France for "half a year" . We visited our local tax office within the first week of being here to register which was in September,

Late hubbie being a personal taxation accountant knew the best time for us to come (ie any date after the start of the 183(5) day residency rule. That way we would not have wait (we did not know how efficient or not the FTO system was) for France and the UK to sort it out. That way we would not have to declare here just register, as all of our income for the beginning of that year was declared and paid in the UK. I finished work at the end of July and hubbie sold his business so finished work at the end of June. So we got a lovely big fat tax rebate from the UK. This helped with initial cash flow which is why we planned it that way.

I have emailed a good friend who was also a personal taxation accountant in the UK for the relevant reference for you to refer to. Ill let you know when I hear back. He has just taken early retirment and I know he and his wife are travelling at the moment - I dont know for how long but as she still works I assume we are talking weeks not months.
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greyman
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Re: Making the move into the French Tax system

Post by greyman » Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:42 pm

OK I know this isn't official but it may be easier to follow than the legal text in French. It is however correct. https://www.blevinsfranks.com/news/blev ... plications

The key part is
You are automatically considered French tax resident if your main home (or foyer) is in France. You would also be considered resident if you spend 183 days in France in any calendar year, or if your principal activity (eg occupation) is in France, or if France is the country of your most substantial assets. If you do meet any of these criteria it is your responsibility to make yourself known to the French tax authorities and fully declare and pay tax on your worldwide income, capital gains and wealth.

183 days is a backstop i.e. over 183 you are indisputably tax resident in France but there are circumstances in which you are resident here before including coming to live here permanently. Notwithstanding that many local officers do not understand this and apply the rule incorrectly - they are administrators and not international tax experts.
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Re: Making the move into the French Tax system

Post by parsnips » Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:59 pm

Hi,
To clear up a bit more nonsense that has emerged on this thread (due to the fat-headed UK government agencies ); there are in fact two different forms S1 which affect UK pensioners moving to France ; the SI (ex E121), which we all know and love, for health care; and form SI 2009 Number 226 formerly known as "France Individual" and , I think , still traceable under the latter title, dealing with double taxation. It all adds to the gaiety of nations!

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Re: Making the move into the French Tax system

Post by Nomoss » Sun Apr 29, 2018 1:57 pm

And to make it more confusing the S1 replaces the E106 and E109 forms as well as the E121 in most countries.

It is described as "Certificate of entitlement to healthcare if you don't live in the country where you are insured. Useful for posted workers, cross-border workers, pensioners and civil servants and their dependants"

Source: https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/w ... dex_en.htm

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