Fuse box abbreviations

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MAH
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Fuse box abbreviations

Post by MAH »

Hello all, does anyone know what the handwritten words 'beus ce' under a fuse on my fuse box means?

It is causing the RCD to flip but following the normal process with fuse boxes and after eliminating everything that is plugged in I can't find what is causing the flip.

Many thanks!

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RobertArthur
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Re: Fuse box abbreviations

Post by RobertArthur »

@ MAH,

CE = chauffe eau électrique = electric boiler.

Could be a gasket leak.

A fuse of 16 or 20 A or also one of 2 A, needed for a contacteur jour/nuit (day/night tariff).

See also diagram one: www.forum-electricite.com/schemas/pb-br ... fe-eau.jpg

Diagram two: https://img.bricoleurdudimanche.com/IMG ... 093199.gif


About French abrévations this list without "beus". The answer is blowing in the wind I'm afraid.

Le Démerdeur
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Re: Fuse box abbreviations

Post by Le Démerdeur »

2 ampères by any chance?

If so then I can hazard a guess.

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RobertArthur
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Re: Fuse box abbreviations

Post by RobertArthur »

Abbrevations continued:

Il y a 3 mots débutant par BEUS
BEUS • beu, s n.f. (= beuh) Fam. Cannabis séché.
• beus n. Pluriel de beu.
BEUSE • beuse n.f. Helv. (= bouse) Fiente de bovin.
• beuse n.f. (Suisse) Variante de bouse.
BEUSES • beuse n.f. Helv. (= bouse) Fiente de bovin.
• beuses n.f. Pluriel de beus.

In theory: BEUS CHAUFFAGE EXTERNE :-)

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Re: Fuse box abbreviations

Post by Le Démerdeur »

Looks like I have finally found a translation for bullsh*t :lol:

Fiente de bovin :good:

I only learned the word fiente yesterday reading about pigeon droppings, every day is a learning day!

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Re: Fuse box abbreviations

Post by FrenchForumSurvivor »

MAH wrote:
Wed Nov 18, 2020 9:36 am
Hello all, does anyone know what the handwritten words 'beus ce' under a fuse on my fuse box means?

It is causing the RCD to flip but following the normal process with fuse boxes and after eliminating everything that is plugged in I can't find what is causing the flip.

Many thanks!
Any chance you can take a photograph of the words and post it, it might make things clearer?
“Donald Trump is a curious blend;
There's crap comes out of either end."
—With apologies to Ogden Nash

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Re: Fuse box abbreviations

Post by RobertArthur »

The RCD sensing a fault current of more than 30 mA going to earth: five usual suspects. An electric boiler, a water heater, lights/sockets outside (garden) and sometimes a defective oven heating element. And of course water somewhere in your wiring.

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Re: Fuse box abbreviations

Post by RobertArthur »

@ MAH, sometimes I try to simplify the process of fault-finding, this time an effort to complicate your ongoing (?) fact finding mission. These fault currents to earth can be a real casse-tête. Where does all the wiring go, did they respect the (colour) regs and last but not least the problem of the common neutral in yesterday's installations électrique.

Where to start? The interrupteur différentiel, designed to sense a small unbalance between two currents, no earthing needed. With the test button you introduce a fault current of about 75 mA (a resistor of 3K3 inside), more than enough to trigger the RCD. Average triggerpoint around 23 mA, it is difficult to produce such an electromechanical device with absolute precision, so the producers stay on the safe side. Acceptable values: between 15 mA and 30 mA.

No electrical installation is perfect: insulation imperfections, modern power supplies of electronic equipment producing small fault currents to earth etc. An example of this in a case presented by Chauvin Arnoux, promoting their measurement equipment.

Gist: because these fault currents are cumulative, there is sometimes more than one trouble maker. With an already present leakage current floor of say 12 mA the RCD needs only a little push to come into action.

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