Book I'm reading:

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Kathyc
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Re: Book I'm reading:

Post by Kathyc »

bluehighway wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 6:52 am
Anyone else like Ian Rankin's Rebus novels?
Very much so, although how they managed to miscast him so badly in the original TV adaptation defeats me!

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bluehighway
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Re: Book I'm reading:

Post by bluehighway »

Kathyc wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:42 am
bluehighway wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 6:52 am
Anyone else like Ian Rankin's Rebus novels?
Very much so, although how they managed to miscast him so badly in the original TV adaptation defeats me!
These things rarely work on the screen. We all have our own Rebus in our heads when reading the books and no actor will ever come up to scratch.
I love the cliché in almost all the books where he oversteps the mark professionally and gets in deep trouble with his superiors, gets back to his lonely flat late at night, pours himself a big measure of whisky, puts a Stones album on the stereo then falls asleep in the chair and wakes up the next morning feeling like sh....
I can really identify with the bloke :D

Kathyc
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Re: Book I'm reading:

Post by Kathyc »

bluehighway wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:49 am
Kathyc wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:42 am
bluehighway wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 6:52 am
Anyone else like Ian Rankin's Rebus novels?
Very much so, although how they managed to miscast him so badly in the original TV adaptation defeats me!
These things rarely work on the screen. We all have our own Rebus in our heads when reading the books and no actor will ever come up to scratch.
I love the cliché in almost all the books where he oversteps the mark professionally and gets in deep trouble with his superiors, gets back to his lonely flat late at night, pours himself a big measure of whisky, puts a Stones album on the stereo then falls asleep in the chair and wakes up the next morning feeling like sh....
I can really identify with the bloke :D
Sometimes they work out. I always saw Rebus as Ken Stott and couldn't imagine why he hadn't been cast from the start rather than John Hannah who was totally unsuitable. I can now watch reruns of the later series in contentment with the TV matching my imagination.

Unfortunately the cliche is pretty similar to a couple of the detective series that I love - Peter Robinson's DCI Banks and Mark Billingham's Tom Thorne. Sometimes it's only the locale and the music they crash out to that differentiates one from the other.

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bluehighway
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Re: Book I'm reading:

Post by bluehighway »

Kathyc wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 11:46 am
Unfortunately the cliche is pretty similar to a couple of the detective series that I love - Peter Robinson's DCI Banks and Mark Billingham's Tom Thorne. Sometimes it's only the locale and the music they crash out to that differentiates one from the other.
I've read some of the Michael Dibdin Aurelio Zen books set in Italy, and some of the various Scandinavian series too, and there seems to be a fairly standard format. The police inspector is always a square peg in a round hole, always separated or divorced from his wife, and has one or two children he rarely sees and probably feels a bit awkward being with. :D

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Re: Book I'm reading:

Post by Youcancallmebetty »

You might, if you love the Rebus books, enjoy Stuart MacBride's Logan McRea series. Equally gritty, but also quite funny in a black kind of way.

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Re: Book I'm reading:

Post by bubbles1 »

The wonderful thing about books and art is that everyone has their own interpretation, understanding and meaning and none is right and none is wrong - thank goodness :good:
The truth is always the truth even if no-one believes it - a lie is always a lie even if everyone believes it

Franksgranny
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Re: Book I'm reading:

Post by Franksgranny »

During lockdown I’ve been forced to buy a Kindle, I’m reading a book called Map of a Nation by Rachel Hewitt, it’s a history of Ordnance Survey, it’s one of those books I’d not normally give a second glance but I’m finding it absolutely fascinating, it’s free on kindle unlimited, which contains a load of rubbish in my opinion, but this is a gem.

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Re: Book I'm reading:

Post by Crazy Diamond »

Franksgranny wrote:
Mon Jun 22, 2020 8:48 pm
During lockdown I’ve been forced to buy a Kindle, I’m reading a book called Map of a Nation by Rachel Hewitt, it’s a history of Ordnance Survey, it’s one of those books I’d not normally give a second glance but I’m finding it absolutely fascinating, it’s free on kindle unlimited, which contains a load of rubbish in my opinion, but this is a gem.
That's a bit of a sweeping statement. Many of the classics are available on Kindle free of charge. I'm currently reading and enjoying Dickens' Bleak House foc on my Kindle. You say you were forced to buy a Kindle, which is a bit strange - does that mean you're not a fan?
Syd.
There is a sufficiency in the world for man’s need, but not for man’s greed.
Mahatma Gandhi.

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