e-bikes

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DominicBest
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Re: e-bikes

Post by DominicBest »

rabbit wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 3:51 pm
Flaneur wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:04 pm
Exactly. But I imagine it's even more difficult to change down when you've got the power assist on :)
ideally you should be in the right gear before you start the ascent as even changing using pedal power puts a big strain on the chain. Of course this is not always possible, but try to change early and frequent when ascending
That’s ok in a world where hills have a constant gradient. That’s not my world.

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Flaneur
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Re: e-bikes

Post by Flaneur »

DominicBest wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 6:40 pm
Flaneur wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:04 pm
Exactly. But I imagine it's even more difficult to change down when you've got the power assist on :)
It’s not something I’ve noticed. The gears change very smoothly up and down. When I’m allowed out on my bike again I will see what I actually do, perhaps I ease off when changing down. I doubt I do as that would go against my instinct when using a derailleur system.
Sorry, I meant "remember to change down"!
Same old nonsense.

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Re: e-bikes

Post by Le Démerdeur »

With the traditional derailleur that I have had on bikes for the last 45 years you do have to back of the power a bit when changing down to avoid graunching & chain wear, most of us that anticipate & change down before the gradient increases dont really have to but if we are half way up a hill and it either steepens or we tire then we certainly do and I'm sure that you do as well Dominic.

I have not experienced them myself but modern sporting derailleurs have a tooth & chain design that will tolerate full power up & down changes even standing out of the saddle.

I say modern, as my bike is circa 1982 they might have been around for 30+ years :lol:

Its a classic now and when the Shimano STI index gearchange lever set finally broke it cost me more for a second hand lever than for a complete new bike but she is worth it to me, currently my only mode of transport.

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Re: e-bikes

Post by DominicBest »

My point was that I often do have to change down partway up a hill even with the pedal assist. The trouble is riding a bike is, well, like riding a bike, you don’t think about it. I’m fairly sure I ease off but keep pedalling when I change down but without trying I couldn’t be sure.
I do think that my e-bike is more like a car with a small free revving engine than one with a lot of torque and do tend to go up hills in fairly low gears anyway.

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Re: e-bikes

Post by Spardo »

I have taken due note with thanks for all the foregoing advice, having not done any cycling really since schooldays.

Bizarrely, although I had a lightweight bike, an Armstrong, which had many gears (can't remember exactly how many) all doubled up by a double clanger at the crank, there was a craze for fixed wheels. So like all my mates I discarded all the gears and the free wheel and used back pressure on the pedals to a great degree for the braking. :roll: There was definitely a need for toe clips. ;) :)

But I am going to increasingly practice with the gears as a means of riding effectively, it is very easy to become lazy in power 5. But until I am fitter, at my age, I must take it step by step. So far I am pleased that, despite my recent asthma diagnosis, I have not been unduly out of breath, and will proceed gradually to avoid any adverse reaction.

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Re: e-bikes

Post by Le Démerdeur »

Yes Dominic, thats exactly what you have to do with a normal unassisted derailleur and I assume with an assisted one, ease off but keep pedalling, the derailleur wont shift if the chain is not moving relative to the sprocket and will graunch if under full load, you can shift under partial load, you used the key words "ease off"

I agree its difficult to analyse what we do with something so reflexive and instinctive as riding a bike.

I rode one E-bike once for a short while when a customer had hired it from the office de tourisme and as always it was in a letahl state of disrepair, I sorted the non functioning brakes as usual and gave it a try, they are not for me!

Not even sure that it had gears, maybe a 3 speed hub? Another customers hired one had derailleurs as I had to go out and extract the chain which had wrapped itself between the spokes & gear block.

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Re: e-bikes

Post by Spardo »

Quite pleased with myself today. I purposely put it on level 2 in 1st gear at the start of the long, 500m, drag up the back lane. Did very well but as it got a bit steeper on the bend (and remember the camber change which can accentuate it) I upped the power to 3 and made it to the top without further help. As it levelled out for the last 100m of gentle incline I dropped to 2 and made my way up through the gears to 7. Turned the corner, flat for 50 metres before the long freewheel back home, and used it to gently drop right down to 1st gear, ready for the sharp double right turn up the drive and through the gate. I made it without getting off, mainly by taking a wider berth to avoid the sideways drift of the driver wheel, getting slightly above the entrance and then powering back through it. Then managed the last rough and slidy bit at the back of the house to make the 180 turn towards the shed and park it. No power button was used in the making of this account. :lol:

I did try standing on the pedals on the steepest bit to avoid the power change up to 3, but the geometry does not lend itself well on this machine. I compared it to an old pushback bought some years ago for my visiting son (another for his wife to be as well). The bike has the crank only a couple of inches forward of the vertical of the seat, and the handlebars well forward of that, whereas the trike has the crank several inches more forward and much nearer to the handlebars. In fact, after failing at that I found the rest of the climb more comfortable with my foreams resting on the hand grips.

Not sure why this should be and I would be interested to hear from anyone with a trike of some other make.

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