Electric cars

SW31girl
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Re: Electric cars

Post by SW31girl » Tue Aug 13, 2019 5:46 pm

There was a very good article in the times this weekend. Several people wrote about the pros and cons.

A few key points struck us both.
1. There are insufficient charging points in the uk - few of them are fast chargers and several are broken.
2. Different cars have different charging plugs - there is not one universal plug.
3. The range of the electric motors considerably reduces in cold weather.
4. All respondents were adamant that the electric cars were only suitable for driving around town.
5. Long journeys needed more planning in order to recharge mid way through the journey.
6. Norway has a one stop shop for all charging activity whereas it’s piecemeal in the uk - you have to have several accounts, one for each charging franchise.
7. Given the uk has barely sufficient surplus electric energy how will the grid cope if everyone starts charging their cars
8. It take 5 minutes to fill a tank on petrol/diesel so would you want to be stuck in a queue for ages waiting to charge up.
9. If you think about the battery it’s not in any way environmental friendly.
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Re: Electric cars

Post by Gardengirl » Tue Aug 13, 2019 6:14 pm

DominicBest wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:40 pm
On my recent travels I saw a lot of electric cars that were far from their place of registration. The people who own them must be confident in their ability to cover long journeys.


Our son-in-law has just taken delivery of a Tesla, having had his charging point installed a few weeks ago. He is planning a drive from near the Channel to Northumberland and back, so he should learn where Tesla charging points are situated.

The only Tesla charging point I’ve ever seen is at a hotel at Matouges that we’ve often stayed at when driving to and from our place in France, only ever seen 1 Tesla on charge.

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Re: Electric cars

Post by DominicBest » Tue Aug 13, 2019 6:33 pm

I saw a British registered Tesla was on the A6 heading south yesterday afternoon, I’ve also seen a lot of Dutch registered ones all over. I spent the weekend in a Swiss city where Teslas seem as common as any other make of car. I know Switzerland is different with its hydro electric infrastructure and a lot of high earners but EVs really do seem to have taken off there. There’s a car park close to where I was staying and it has two charging points and I’ve seen several Teslas charging there alongside more humble EVs. All the multi storey parking places have signs indicating how many charging points they have and how many are available.
It’s also worth pointing out that if you’re walking and an EV approaches at 40-50kmh it sounds just like any other car, it’s road noise you hear not the engine or exhaust. When they pull away from the traffic lights is when they are strangely quiet.

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Re: Electric cars

Post by bluebird » Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:38 pm

SW31girl wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 5:46 pm
There was a very good article in the times this weekend. Several people wrote about the pros and cons.

A few key points struck us both.
1. There are insufficient charging points in the uk - few of them are fast chargers and several are broken.
2. Different cars have different charging plugs - there is not one universal plug.
3. The range of the electric motors considerably reduces in cold weather.
4. All respondents were adamant that the electric cars were only suitable for driving around town.
5. Long journeys needed more planning in order to recharge mid way through the journey.
6. Norway has a one stop shop for all charging activity whereas it’s piecemeal in the uk - you have to have several accounts, one for each charging franchise.
7. Given the uk has barely sufficient surplus electric energy how will the grid cope if everyone starts charging their cars
8. It take 5 minutes to fill a tank on petrol/diesel so would you want to be stuck in a queue for ages waiting to charge up.
9. If you think about the battery it’s not in any way environmental friendly.
The big plus for electric vehicles is the potential reduction in urban pollution. The air quality in major towns and cities is becoming dangerous.
One thing I have noticed a lot in France is the amount of folks who like to keep their (filthy diesel) engines running when parked up, either to keep the heater or AC running. Also seems in France quite common for drivers to
de-activate the stop/start function.

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Re: Electric cars

Post by Spotty » Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:57 pm

bluebird wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:38 pm
Also seems in France quite common for drivers to
de-activate the stop/start function.
Out of interest, how do you know this ?

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DominicBest
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Re: Electric cars

Post by DominicBest » Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:00 am

Deactivate is a strong word. None of my cars is new enough to have a stop start function but I used to go in a friend’s BMW that did quite a lot. There was a simple button to switch it on or off. My friend always kept her’s switched off. She was an Englishwoman living in Germany so I’m not sure that it is a crime that can be blamed on ‘the French’.

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Re: Electric cars

Post by mysty » Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:32 am

In towns or near roundabouts I switch it off. The second it saves on starting gets you out safer in my opinion.
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Re: Electric cars

Post by jsks » Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:40 am

The issue I have with this stop/start thing is the mechanical wear on the engine. Firstly, repeated starting will ultimately shorten the life of the starter motor. More importantly every time the engine stops the circulating oil drains into the sump so that when the engine restarts there is a momentary period where the top end of the engine is short of lubrication. Multiply by hundreds of stops and this will increase engine wear

It was developed in isolation to reduce CO2 emissions during type approval testing. It's benefit in real world motoring is negligible.
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Fitter
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Re: Electric cars

Post by Fitter » Wed Aug 14, 2019 10:22 am

jsks wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:40 am
The issue I have with this stop/start thing is the mechanical wear on the engine. Firstly, repeated starting will ultimately shorten the life of the starter motor. More importantly every time the engine stops the circulating oil drains into the sump so that when the engine restarts there is a momentary period where the top end of the engine is short of lubrication. Multiply by hundreds of stops and this will increase engine wear

It was developed in isolation to reduce CO2 emissions during type approval testing. It's benefit in real world motoring is negligible.
The reality is somewhat different, it takes 5 to 10 minutes for an engine to drain down, and an oil film will remain in cam bearings, followers, chains etc. Try this simple test - with a hot idling engine, stop it on the key, wait half a minute and dip the oil. Dip the oil 10 minutes later and you will find the oil level is higher by 3-5 mm or so.
Wear on the starter motor I agree with - stop/start is purely a wheeze to get a lower CO2 reading - totally superfluous in real world driving conditions.
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Re: Electric cars

Post by jsks » Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:06 am

The piece of equipment that suffers most from lack of oil pressure is the turbo bearings. If the turbo is hot when the engine stops the oil vapourises and on restart the bearings are momentarily dry. Constant stop start will lead to premature turbo failure.

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